About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
WETA 37
LANGUAGE
English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
making closing arguments on an issue that's been front and center throughout the campaign. did an economy in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring.
hear that when there's a sdater like zandi, that it's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be true in this case? >> well, no. this is a natural disaster. disasters are bad for the economy. obviously, the big hit to the economy initially, is what we're seing in new york. you do get rebuilding, and economy benefits from that, but net, net, the economy is in a worse place. natural disasters are bad for the economy, not good. >> susie: you heard in erica's remit some businesses are going to benefit, maybe hox*echl builders and cuk companies. if you look at the economy, who are the winners and losers in terms of various sectors? >> well, there's more losers than winners. the losers would be the restaurants, they're not going to serve meals that aren't getting served. airlines, trucking companies, you know, the casinos fnlt fshs services. the secretaried to and trading is shut down for a couple of days, never get that back. the winners are clear. the homebuilders, home improvement, you mentioned home depot and loews and hardware stores. online retailers might benefit because d
by -- ♪ >> wherever our trail blazers -- trains divorce, the economy comes to live. norfolk southern. one line, infinity possibilities the >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a belter tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. additional funding is also provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. it's about 8:00 p.m. eastern time two fridays before the election and according to the app on my iphone, we have 10 days, 23 hours, 15 minutes and 53 seconds before the polls close. accord dog every one of what seems like a thousand polls taken this week, this thing say true dead heat. so what are the candidates up to? they are releasing new ads every day. it's said that character is what we do when no one
back to the economy today; investors and traders liked what they heard. americans are feeling the most optimistic they have been in nearly five years about their finances and the outlook for the economy. the conference board's confidence index jumped to a reading of 72.2 last month. driving that gain, an improving job market. new claims for unemployment insurance fell by 9,000 in the past week to 363,000, showing ctur urct we'll have more on jobs in a moment. uras for stocks, the dow gained 136 points, the nasdaq was up 42, the s&p adding 15. >> susie: but economists say that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the
're talking about longer delays, and return to normal production and slightly bigger hit on the economy. s this's certainly true. >> tom: what about the impact on the job market. we were supposed to have the october jobs numbers this friday. still expected to come out. not going to be impacted because of this storm but what about november's numbers? >> that's a great question. sometime these major events, those storms are right in the middle of the reference period during which bls measures employment. but sandy is occurring almost directly between october's reference month and november's reference month, actually-- impact of this on the official government numbers for employment. >> tom: just 20 seconds left but damage to confidence at all, consumer confidence? >> no, i think not. people are resilient. they will see through this. they'll get back to the business of rebuilding which of course is a plus for gdp and back to that activity very quickly. >> we hope it happens faster than not. joeling prakken with us, a look at the economy, macroeconomic advisors. it may seem a bit premature to
the impact on our economy. and on transportation. you know, the election will take care of itself next week. >> and here is what governor romney said. >> on the eastern coast of our nation, a lot of people are enduring some very difficult times. >> and our hearts and our prayers go to them as we think about how tough it is going to be there. i don't think there has been a hurricane in ohio in a long time. but there have been some hurricanes that have caused a lot of damage across this country and hurt a lot of families and their families are in harm's ways that will be hurt either in their possessions or perhaps even something more severe. >> we have faced these kind of challenges before and as we have, it is good to see how americans come together and this looks like another time when we need to come together, all across the country, even here in ohio and make sure we give of our support of the people who need it. >> rose: several national polls have the president and governor romney in a virtual dead heat coming down the stretch, some others have different results when you look at the swi
broke on friday that the economy grew at an annual rate of 2% rate not great, but better than expected economic news, the last gdp report before the election. right now i have a very shaky limb i will ask each of you to step out on a date if the election were held tomorrow, mark, who would win? >> i should not go out on any limb, given my weight, but if the election were held tomorrow, obama would win, based on early voters. >> evan? >> obama, but we still have a long way to go. >> nina? >> i hate doing this, but i would say obama because of the ground again, but that is just today. >> that's ok. colby? >> the national tracking polls as them close, but if you go to the key battleground states, obama still holds a lead in those states and that will put him over the top. >> what is the ground game, mark? >> the organized effort over months to identified not only supporters not onlyleaners -- only supporters, but leaners. by election day, you know who your voters are and you want to be sure they go to a. > -- to vote. >> in many the battleground states, obama has more field offices. >> i
this conversation going. most of them are concerned about the state of the economy and jobs and that's what they are going to the whole thinking about. >> what we know is abortion is the leading topic for women. 39% to 19% to the economy. with the electorate being 56% women, swing voters being a key women demographic, the candidates and the campaigns need to address the issue and have to be in front of it. that's why they are trying to make it an issue. >> i laugh because murdoch's comment along with todd akin, it's men bation the dumb remarks and not representative of the republican party. what i think is funny -- >> it's not unrepresentative enough that candidate romney is willing to drop that ad. >> i think it's not representative of the republican party. how i'm going to finish answering the question is that what's happening is democrats and president obama are doing a trumped-up war on women. they started it up in majority of. march. women are smarter than that. romney is tied 47% with obama about the vote. this is about our pocketbooks and bank accounts and jobs and women has been eff
gets. he will have to discuss why there are better times ahead. why he can manage the economy. that has been lackluster. i think that home would be kinder. >> how long does it take and how much does it cost to rebuild the battered communities? in japan, they are still asking that question a year after the tsunami. billions of dollars destined for reconstruction have been misspent. >> the images of the massive it tsunami is surging ashore in march 2011 are indelibly burned into the members of people around the world. the destruction was on a scale few people had ever seen before and many found it hard to comprehend. the coastline more than 250 rsteme lg wass left utterly devastated. whole town's white from the map in a matter of minutes. it was clear that the cleanup and rebuilding was going to be an enormous effort. the biggest since the end of world war ii. the japanese government to decide 150 billion u.s. dollars to fund it. it turns out that a quarter is spent on projects completely unrelated to the disaster. the list of projects, according to the japanese government's audit, is qui
development and the jobs numbers can play into that. people are saying they feel good about the economy even though they don't trust the president. >> i see these job numbers as basically being status quo. they can affect things in a big way. the decimal point kicked up one point but the actual job number was a little higher than forecasted. mitt romney has won the economy, not by a huge margin. generally, that's a good thing for a challenger. he's won the issue of bipartisan. i think president obama's trying to close some of that ground. but people will say that the ability to capture the center is important to them. they seem to be tilting a little bit in mitt romney's favor. those are good fundamentals. they don't make up, in my mind, as best we can tell for the very formidable electoral college math that is working much more in president obama's favor. gwen: what do you think about that, jackie? >> i agree. we could be looking at, we're all sort of talking and gaming an electoral college victory for the president who loses the popular vote. does anybody really think that's going to happe
already been badly hit by the economy. >> exactly. talk about the public sectors, the boardwalks, the promise on -- the promenade along the businesses. two-thirds of the businesses of the boardwalk were destroyed or carried away. many of the municipal buildings cannot be used anymore. that is a problem in terms of emergency services. >> the white house as announced that the president will be visiting new jersey tomorrow. what do you need in the form of assistance? >> almost everything. you know, not only residences and businesses, but the public sector as well. there is a lot of damage to the public infrastructure. we know that with fema, which is the federal emergency management agency, we will get help for a lot of this. but i'm glad the president is coming. you need to see this firsthand. and what i heard the potential damage of the storm and i was evacuated from my house i thought, this is going to be bad. but when you see it in person you cannot believe how catastrophic is. >> we have been looking at those photos, but i can imagine in person it is a very different story. i'm
given the way the economy has gone the last few years. >> politico is reporting that liberals are worried that if obama is reelected, he will make a deal -- >> i hope so. >> i hope so, too. obviously, they know what message sells. even eric cantor, obstructionist-in-chief, said that we need to put aside our differences and reach compromise. there has obviously been message research. >> can't we all of this get along, mark? >> rodney king for lieutenant governor. right direction, wrong track number, 41% think we are headed in the right direction. dramatic improvement. how would you feel that the president is reelected? 50% feel positive. these are the numbers in the same nbc poll from eight years ago when george w. bush won 50 .7% of the vote. that is the parallel of this election. 2004, 2012, incumbent, beleaguered, a close election, ohio decided. -- ohio is at the epicenter today. and that is the story from washington. [laughter] >> thus spaketh -- there is the benediction. >> things are a lot shakier now than they were then, i think that people sense that. how bad does the c
, but the u.s. economy has failed to recover. >> he said he was going to focus on creating jobs. instead he focused on obamacare, which killed jobs. he said he was going to cut the federal deficit in half, and then he doubled it. he said he was going to lower the unemployment rate down to 5.2% right now. today we learned that it's actually 7.9%, and that's nine million jobs short of what he promised. >> mr. romney's campaign is snapping at the heels of the incumbent president. his campaign organizers say they can and will win, but they can win only if they take the vital swing states of florida, virginia and ohio. anything less than the prospects receive for them. >> this race is very, very close. it may confound pollsters and pundits alike. it's not clear how or if hurricane sandy will affect the results, but i think we can venture this far -- president obama appears to be holding on to a very narrow lead. adam brooks, bbc news, washington. >> bold predictions in a tight race. as adam just reported, no state is more hotly contested than ohio. laura is in cleveland for us tonight at a cleve
well. they said it shows the economy is virtually at a standstill because basically the unemployment rate is where it was when obama was sworn in. now the obama administration is pointing out they created more than five million jobs since the president took office in the private sector, that is. and also, if you look at the first full month the president was in office the unemployment rate was 8.3%. now it's 7.9. >> tom: instead of arguing about the data, what about the demographics here? because polls, obviously, show this is an extremely close race going into tuesday. so what about the key voting demographics in this jobs report? >> reporter: you know, one little nugget that i thought was very interesting, the unemployment rate for white men has fall tone 6.6% and about a year ago it was 7.8%. that is a key voting demographic, but interestingly enough, even though the unemployment rate is coming down, that demographic is going as much as two to one for romney. you know, sometimes demographic information and the unemployment information doesn't always sync up. >> tom: timing is ever
absolute certainly in foreign policy and the economy, we can't wait around until we know for certain we need to take steps now. >> rose: that's what the mayor pointed to, carbon attacks or maybe able to measure carbon standards. where is there a model, steve, of a city in the world that's responded to the challenge? >> well, it depends on how much wealth you have. i mean holland, the netherlands is essentially an engineered country that if in the absence of its wealth and its willingness to spend that wealth on engineering the seas to keep low lands occupied by dutch people, it wouldn't be a viable country. the question for the united states is because we are a coastal country with, as one of the other guests said 4 million people at least at high tide never mind back up a bit to account for three feet of higher seas in 30 or 40 years. this is not a problem that can be solved by engineering alone. not on a national scale. manhattan could solve it by engineering is alone, at least for half a century but the whole country can. the question is really from a policy perspective, from a taxp
the american economy and essentially saved it by kicking out all of these good-for-nothing ceos and making companies, once again, economically efficient and productive. these folks think they're heroes and they saved america. and the public thinks they are villains and their whole job is to enrich themselves and destroy jobs. >> narrator: the aftermath of some of the leveraged buyout deals was devastating: bankruptcies, factory closures, employees laid off. >> bain capital was never set up to be a job creation program. it was set up to make wealthy investors even wealthier. they didn't sit around the table talking about how many jobs this would create. oftentimes it was the opposite, how many jobs could be cut to make the company more efficient. >> mitt is a person who wants to be successful. making money is how you're measured in the private equity and venture capital business, but you're making money for your investors first and foremost, and that was always mitt's focus was to make money for them. >> narrator: the way those closest to him tell it, he had come to see himself as a white k
program. i do believe that's one of the reasons the economy is sluggish now. it was 2012 where the banks started increasing their loan. if you make the banks all profitable again it will take care of the rest of the economy and it doesn't work that way. >> rose: so you're not happy with the tarp program which others see as a success? >> how do you define "success?" we didn't go over the cliff. >> rose: and a lot of the loans have been paid back. >> on a cash-flow basis the tarp investment money has made money. if you look at it from a subs key standpoint-- in order, if citypaid 5% dividend, if they had to go to the market what would they have had to pay? it will never turn a profit on that basis. >> rose: the financial structure was so bad the interest rates would have been so high. >> people differ on how they measure costs, and i think, again, on a subsidy basis, if you looked at subsidies, they would not have made my -- >> rose: there is this. whenever i read about you during that time or whenever i talked to you, whenever i sat next to you at some event, the central thing i said abou
to get the money that we need in a way that won't tank the economy, that will increase the likelihood of economic growth?" and so, the problem now facing the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that candidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment values had something to do with this? >> well, i think suspense was what was required down to the wire. and that's what we got. one won one, another won another. then a couple of draws. what could be better for keeping people watching? unfortunately, the lack of an answer to who sacrifices what is only the beginning of an endless list that, for me, is a reason to be disappointed, not just in the debates, but in the entire campaign. i want to find out about things that are important, about plutocracy taking over democracy, the widening gulf between the powerful and
on immigration reform? >> i think the economy has improved, and we are not in an emergency situation. the reality remains that the congressional republican party is for a much against immigration reform, so if the president is reelected, i think he will have a tremendous amount of support and an obligation to fulfill some promises, and that will be one of his priorities going forward. tavis: what happens if this does not become a major priority for him to? >> i think that would be a problem. i think he would lose a lot of support, and people would be betrayed. immigration reform has to be understood by recovery. there are nonpartisan studies that show immigration reform is a mechanism to drive economic growth. it just makes sense to america. there is a and a emotional aspect, and people feel really hurt and pushed away, but at the end of today, it is an economic issue, and that is the way it has to be framed. tavis: tell me why you believe they will take a different tack if mr. obama wins. if the president wins, he wins with a significant slice. the overwhelming majority of latinos will have vote
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possle by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: hurricane sandy began battering its way ashore today, threatening days of destruction. the huge system had 50 million people in its sights and was already being called a superstorm. the winds grew stronger by the hour. and the rain poured harder, soaking the east coast as the hurricane closed in. nine states declared emergencies, and people up and down the coast braced for heavy flooding, wind damage, and resulting power outages. >> i just got another load of sandbags to put around the doors to keep the water out. got the generator ready to go. and we're going to sit there and ride it out. no place
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other
would do a better job leading the country's economy. at his first step in wisconsin, president obama appealed for another term in office to finish the job he started. a short time ago, he was given the backing of new york's mayor michael bloomberg, who endorsed the president's citing specifically the issue of climate change. i ask the political reporter for the "washington post" what he would be watching out for. we're entering the portion of the campaign where i start to the people who run for president just have a different team than the rest of us -- different gene than the rest of us. >> there is no doubt about that, but this is an incredibly close election at this point. a lot of people predicted this a year ago, that it would be close, and they've got the election they anticipated. a handful of states will decide if the candid -- will decide it. candidates will be in and out of the state's multiple times. >> what can they actually do at this stage? barack obama, mitt romney, to try to persuade people after two years of campaigning and, whenever it is, a couple of billion dollar
have significant reserves of shale gas. we also have right now the second largest growing economy in all of the oecd countries. we have very low levels of inflation. we have very low levels of unemployment. we have just created this year 780,000 new jobs. >> rose: but is tourism down because of all of the stories of violence against tourism. >> no, in 2011 tourism has reached record numbers. it has increased by 18% relative to what we had at the beginning of our term. we had a figure here 191 million total tourists between, internal tourists and 23.4 international tourists. everyone going to mexico is returning back to their countries and saying it's worth. >> rose: what will be an optimal, how does a good relationship between mexico and the united states, what elements would it have and how would it be of great benefit to both the economic and cultural life of those countries? >> i think we need to recognize that we share geography, we share history. we share future, our future. i think the more we think about north america as a region. >> rose: from canada to mexico. >> from
transparency, people's involvement in these urban change decisions. but behind it lies the fact that economy is booming so fast that no one can control it anymore. for me the ahasing thing is that i can say that in relation to "silent house" is that i've been living for 60 years. there've vn times that i've come back this or that that the change i saw in the first 45 years less than the change i saw in the last 15 years. >> wow. how is it different? change in the last 15? is it just velocity? >> velocity. immense economical -- political change is more development of say -- development of free speech and liberal society and because of economics and it's hard to control turkey anymore. it's so rich and coming that it's hard to crush it down and control it. >> rose: as i a writer do you -- and because of the run in you had you were criticized for criticizing turkey, correct? >> yes. >> rose: they arrested you. >> no. >> rose: well, they didn't arrest you but -- >> i was fined but then it was dropped because of international pressure. >> rose: exactly. i understand that. do you fear at all now w
." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leadin
to was economy university. i did it for a year. then two years of law. basically i didn't really know what i wanted to do. and it seemed the right thing that my parents said as long as you study we will pay for everything. so i did this university for three years. and then i had a stint at san diego, california, which is a place that i really adore. but i guess i was looking more for a new york energy and it didn't have it. so i then went to london, 1976, to study kpun cases. i went to california to do international relations then went to london-- it was really just any excuse to be able to be kept by my parents in a way. in london i fell into photography. >> rose: how did you fall into it. >> it's a really funny story. i believe so much that things come to you. and basically i went to a friend's house for lunch and there was a foted owe of himself on his mantle piece. and i said what a great photograph. and he told me this girl studying photography here took it. i said i have always heard of this girl i would love to meet her. i went to meet her at her school. when a rifed if he school she
. with a are we going to do to get people working and grow the economy? how are we going to address the housing crisis and what are you going to do to protect medicare and social security? i have strong positions on those issues. my opponent does not. >> reporter: tarkanian has benefited from his family's well known name here but failed to win an election in three prior attempts at public office. he has his own take on this race. >> i've tried very hard to get out to all the different areas within the community. i've had business meetings. i've had meetings with business leaders in the african-american community talking about businesses who are there and how we can help them get started and expand. at the same time i've been out in areas talking to the onion farmers and some of the ranchers about the issues they're dealing with with workers and so forth. i've tried very hard to be a good representative and good a good understanding of what's important for those constituents. >> reporter: in august the campaign was infused with racial tension when tarkanian seemed to suggest that horsford was re
moving rapidly towards ebooks and the economy of ebooks is much more attractive no paper cost no printing, no contribution cost, no returns. >> no returns. >> huge advance, so at what point do publishers say hey, i have-- it's crazy to me economically to be publishings and printing booksing printing books, not publishing ebooks that is such a good point because in most other countries there were no hard bound booksment we did hard cover to help our p & l, our profit and loss statement. i do think that the hard cover book will start to diminish in quantity, yes. i don't believe that the publisher, that a true publisher will ever give up on printing physical books. >> i disagree with that. >> but, well, but i will talk to you about that. because i think that there will always be a want and a need for a certain group of society to have the printed book. and perhaps the printed book will become even more expensive and more valuable because it will be printed better and it will be done on better paper, et cetera. but i think the point of marketing is where this is all, where this all comes to.
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)